Antigua


Cruise port: St. John's, Antigua


St. Johns, Antigua: One of the most economic diverse islands we have seen. While most of the population are middle-class, there is a contrast with areas of poverty next to multi-million dollar Mega Yachts at Lord Nelson's Dockyard marina. This is also one of those islands hard for large cruise ships to get into, so I would suspect its limited to the smaller ships. We were here one time, in Dec 2009. Its been said that there are 365 beaches in Antigua; one for each day of the year.

We arrived in Antigua on a Sunday. This was unusual as most Antiguan's spend hours in church on Sundays, and they don't see many cruise ships on that day. When we a new port for the first time, we usually take an island cruise excursion. This gives us a good perspective and overview of the island, so the next time we visit, we can concentrate on a more specific adventure.

Admiral Nelson's dockyard had a lot of history, and we had to leave too soon. You could easily spend the entire day there. The history of the dockyard is that in the times of Admiral Nelson in the 1800s, the British Navy used the harbor as a major ship repair facility for their Caribbean fleet.

 

 

The local residents typically pronounce Antigua as "Antigur" as if they were from New England. Local legend also has it that the British named Antigua from a slang term "anti-agua" as there is no fresh "agua" (water) on the island.


Entry into Harbor - St. Johns, Antigua

Cruise ship docks - St. Johns, Antigua


English Harbor - Falmouth, Antigua

The Lookout - Antigua


Admiral Nelson's Dockyard - English Harbor, Antigua

St. Johns Harbor - St. Johns, Antigua


Ffreye's Beach, Antigua

Old sugar cane processing furnace, Antigua


Cedar's Pottery, Antigua

Zip-lining in Antigua


Jolly Beach, Antigua

In late spring, the Mangos are in season, Antigua

 

Antigua Tourism

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